Saturday, November 07, 2020

The Longwinded Making of the Hagrid's Hut - The Roof

You've found the second part of my Hagrid's Hut walk-through: The Roof

The completed Hagrid's Hut can be found HERE

Because I added a number of elements to the Octagon Room Box used to make this project, I wanted to create a rundown of the basic construction. There's a lot to go through, so I've broken it up into three parts: The ExteriorThe Roof, and The Interior.

When making this project I alternated working on the inside/outside as glue/paint dried. So don't feel like you have to complete one area before moving on. 

Finally, I won't be going into fine details here, but I think these steps will be helpful if you want to create a similar project.

On to the roof!

I created a roof using corrigated cardboard. Cut four triangles measuring 6.25" wide at the base and 9" tall. Take one of those triangular pieces and cut in half, vertically.


Arrange the cut pieces as they appear in the top image. The two half pieces on either end, the three large pieces in the middle. It's like a terribly cut pizza.

Using tape, join those pieces together ON ONE SIDE ONLY. I used hockey tape, eh, but you can use whatever you have on hand. The pieces SHOULD be able bend and move.


On the side with the tape, cover with paper that you want for the ceiling/interior roof of your hut. Make sure that the pieces are still flexible.

Now, you're going to want to do a bit of fiddling around with placement. The roof should bend nicely to the top edge of the hut, you just need to find the sweet spot where it fits just so. When you find it, add some tape to maintain the angle...


... then glue to the top edge with hot glue to secure in place. Try not to get too messy with the glue on the inside, instead using a bead of glue around the exterior overhang.


The roof is short and stout. If you'd like to experiment and make something taller and spikier, you'll want to add to the height of the triangles, while maintaining the width. 


I've added a smokestack extending from my roof. This too is made from cardboard, the sides taped. I wasn't worried about a hole in the chimney as I knew I'd be adding a raven perched on the top. You may want to consider constructing your chimney like an open-ended box to include an opening.


Use drywall compound on the stack, just as you did at the side of the house. 

Paint the surface of the roof black. Again, this is very useful for camouflage purposes, no matter what material you'll be using.


I'm using bark to cover my roof. It wasn't my first choice. I wanted to use coconut fiber which gives a wonderful, almost thatched roof effect. Whatever you do choose to use keep two things in mind.

1. Weight. This roof isn't meant to hold a great deal of weight so keep things light. You could reinforce the structure if you like, but if not, keep the weight of your materials in mind.

2. Remember those ugly corrugated edges. I simply added a bit of length to cover them up, but it's something you'll need to keep in mind.


Once the roof is covered in a layer of bark, I tuck moss here and there.


The roof was far too light for my liking so I darkened it up with a few washes of diluted paint.

You'll also notice I've started adding moss and grasses around the door and bottom edge. There's a Miniature Antique Brass Door Pull too... I may or might not have installed that upside-down.


Something still seemed to missing or just 'off' at this point. I added some snippets of twigs to look like roof supports and I really think they created balance.

In addition to more moss and grass, you can see the chimney has had a bit of age tossed at it.

Just keep adding loads light washes of grime and you'll have your brand new hut looking old in no time at all!

Next, the guts! Let's see the insides put together.  The Interior.


You can browse all of the sweet, sweet AlphaStamps items used in this project HERE 

The additional items used in it the construction:
• corrugated cardboard
• thin cardboard
• acrylic paint
• glue
• acrylic latex silicone
• drywall compound
• twigs and bark
• miscellaneous bits n' pieces



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